Definition of Some Gaelic Terms.

DEFINITIONS OF SOME SCOTTISH GAELIC TERMS:   The Gaelic terms are italicized:

Alasdair                –      Alexander.

Aonghas               –      Angus.

Baile                      –      Town.

Chiainn Domhnaill –    Clan Donald.

Clann Ùisdein       –      Children of Hugh.

Dubh                     –      Black.

Dhòmhnaill           –      Donald.    Pronounced “Donnell.”

Dunscaith             –      Fort of Sgaithaich.

Eoin                       –      John.

Gallaibh               –      Caithness (name of a place in Scotland).

Gilleasbaig           –      Archibald.

Gorm                     –      Bluish-green.

Hearach               –      Harris.

Mhic                      –      Mac.  Son of.  May also be Mc, Ma or M’.

Mhic Dhòmhnaill    –    Macdonald.    Pronounced   ‘ic donnell.

Mac Ùisdein          –      Son of Hugh.

Raghnall                –      Reginald.

Ŕi Innse Gall          –      King of the Isles.

Shenachie             –      Story teller or historian.

Somhairle             –      Somerled.

Ùisdean                –      Hugh.    Pronounced “Oosdn” or “Ooshdn”.   The pronunciation was meant to sound like the ocean waves hitting the shoreline.

Ùisdein                  –      Patronymic  from the personal name of Hugh.  Patronyms are components of a personal name  based on one’s father.  Used as a means of conveying lineage.  Patronyms predate  the use of last names.  Example:  MacÙisdein.   The historical Society for Clan Donald use MacÙisdean not  MacÙisdein.

Ùis                            –    Translates as spirit, breath or life as in Ùis gebreatha or usquebaugh which means “water of life” and is the Gaelic name for……..Whiskey.

Uist                        –      West.

Bi h-eibhneas gan Chiainn Domhnaill –           IT IS NO JOY WITHOUT CLAN DONALD.

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